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2002-2003 ANNUAL REPORT
CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES PROGRAM

A. OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENTS IN FY 2003

Faculty serve Criminal Justice Studies as administrators, members of the Executive Committee, and instructors in our interdisciplinary program. Individual faculty accomplishments are not provided here as Criminal Justice Studies operates with no faculty lines. Individual faculty are recruited, evaluated, and promoted within their respective departments. Their accomplishments, then, are included in their respective departmental reports. It is important to note, however, that faculty associated with Criminal Justice Studies have distinguished records as scholars, teachers, and university citizens. Included in the roster of CJSP-affiliated faculty are winners of the Josiah Meigs Awards, Sandy Beaver Professorships, Special Sandy Beaver Awards, Instructional Improvement Grants, Lilly Fellows, Senior Teaching Fellows, and other internal and external distinctions. In the 2003-2004 academic year, for example, Jody Clay-Warner of the Sociology Department won the CURO Undergraduate Research Mentoring Award. David Mustard of the Economics Department was a recipient of a Sarah Moss Fellowship and Susette Talarico of the Political Science Department was awarded (with Thomas A. Eaton of the School of Law) a Creative Research Medal.

Students enrolled as majors in Criminal Justice continue to distinguish themselves in the classroom and on campus. As detailed in Table 3, a substantial number of Criminal Justice students earned Presidential Scholar and Dean's List distinctions during the 2002-03 academic year. The percentage of students earning Presidential Scholar/Dean’s List distinctions continues to be almost one third of the total criminal justice majors enrolled in any given term. Of the 77 students who graduated with a degree in Criminal Justice during the 2002-03 academic year approximately 25% did so with honors. Twelve students graduated with cum laude distinction, 2 with magna cum laude honors, and 2 with summa cum laude. (See Table 1.)

Criminal Justice Studies was able to award its second scholarship in the Fall of 2002. Kristie R. Flowers was the recipient of the Sherry Lyons-Williams Scholarship. The scholarship was established in memory of the first female Atlanta police officer to be killed in the line of duty and is designated for a criminal justice major planning a career in law enforcement. The award was in the amount of $1200. Recipient Kristie Flowers, was recognized at an award ceremony held in Baldwin Hall. Guests included the husband of the late Sherry Lyons-Williams, close friend and fund initiator, Kathy Papa, representatives from the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, and Criminal Justice Program faculty, staff and students. To date over $43,000 has been donated in memory of Ms. Lyons-Williams.

Two additional scholarship funds were initiated in the 2002-03 year. The Kenneth M. McCarthy Scholarship was made possible by the Camden County Sheriff’s Department to aid a criminal justice major with a stated financial need. The first recipient, Lashawn Blake was awarded the scholarship ($2000) at a ceremony in Camden County, Georgia, on November 7th, 2002. Dean Wyatt Anderson and Director Susette Talarico were in attendance for the presentation. In addition, the James T. Morris Memorial Scholarship has been initiated. Although its funding is limited at this time, we anticipate that we will be able to offer a third student scholarship as funds accrue.

With the death of criminal justice major William Christopher Bush III, a memorial fund was set up as he had requested. Will had asked that any funds collected be used to promote student professional development in general and, in particular, professional travel for criminal justice students. Within the last year an additional $4000 in gifts was received enabling our goal of $10,000 to be realized. Now a permanent fund in Will’s name has been established.

As noted in last year’s report, the need for computers for criminal justice majors’ use (particularly in research methods classes) has been an urgent one. With the approval for funding by the Technology Task Force, Criminal Justice Studies has obtained 29 laptop computers for student instructional use. Classroom use of laptops provides the necessary computer applications and improves instruction in the required Pols/Soci 3700 (Research Methods in Criminal Justice). This is a major accomplishment for the program, as access to computers for data analysis is a critical component of our students’ education. The addition of these computers will enable criminal justice graduates to compete and succeed in today’s electronic environment.

During the 2002-03 academic year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its association with the national Criminal Justice Honor Society, Alpha Phi Sigma. The UGA chapter, Upsilon Gamma Alpha, completed its seventh full year of operation in 2002-03 and a total of 12 Criminal Justice majors were recognized at the Spring Graduation and Awards Banquet. Members recognized achieved eligibility through the Fall term of 2002. (See Table 3.) CJSP also continued to support the undergraduate student organization, CJ Society.

In 2003, the Criminal Justice Studies Program continued the annual Graduation and Awards Banquet inaugurated in the Spring, 1997 term. The guest speaker at this function was Criminal Justice alumnus, Mr. Russell Tolley. The families of graduates and honorees were invited, various awards were presented, and the honor society induction ceremony was conducted. Sincerai Stallings was recognized with the 2003 Award for Outstanding Senior, while Ryan Merritt won the 2003 Outstanding Paper Award. Service certificates were presented to Meredith Speck, Sarah Manson, and Tara Clark for their work with the Criminal Justice Society; to Sincerai Stallings for her work with the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice and to John Stofer for his service on the Dean’s Student Advisory Board. The following 6 students were recognized for academic excellence (3.5 or higher overall gpa): Alejandro Garcia, Meredith Speck, Sincerai Stallings, Gregory Stein, John Stofer, and Staci Swit. In addition to these exemplary student distinctions, Stephanie Langston was inducted into the Blue Key Honor Society and Staci Marie Swit and Jennifer J. Bell were selected for inclusion in Who’s Who in American Colleges and Universities.

During the past year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its broad range of program events and student services. The Program continued with its orientation seminar for new majors, library research seminars for new majors, a guest lecture series, an annual alumni panel, workshops on career planning and graduate education, and a variety of student-faculty socials. A highlight of the year’s programs, though, was the Crime Film Festival held in February 2003 to help celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Criminal Justice Studies Program. Additionally, the program worked with the undergraduate Criminal Justice Society and helped to provide tours of criminal justice offices and institutions. Students toured the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and the Georgia State Maximum Security Correctional Facility in the Fall 2002 term. The Program also worked with the CJ Society on community service projects. The CJ Society sponsored a toy drive for children of inmates at the Clarke County Jail and a work day with a local Habitat for Humanity project. For the fourth year, CJSP sponsored the Federal Law Enforcement Seminar and Employment Workshop. Funding for this was provided by the Criminal Justice Society and Professor Talarico’s Saye Professorship. Guest speakers for 2002-2003 were Dr. Alan Ault of the National Institute of Corrections (Fall 2002) and Dr. Nicole Rafter of Northeastern University who gave the keynote address at the Spring, 2003 Crime Film Festival. The former was funded with support from Professor Talarico’s Saye Professorship, while the latter was made possible by the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Student Fee Allocation Committee, the School of Public and International Affairs, the Department of Sociology, and Professor Talarico’s Saye Professorship. In addition, several local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities were invited to speak.

As noted in previous annual reports, Criminal Justice Studies has developed a student exchange program with two universities in the United Kingdom, the University of Leicester and Lancaster University. At the University of Leicester, this exchange program was developed with the Departments of Law and Sociology. Three UGA students studied at Leicester and one British student came to UGA in 2002-03; one UGA student studied at Lancaster University during the 2002-03 academic year.

B. PROGRESS TOWARD ACHIEVING THE STRATEGIC PLAN

The Criminal Justice Studies Program's primary efforts in the area of strategic planning focused on the role of the program in the School of Public and International Affairs. Criminal Justice Studies is jointly housed in the School of Public and International Affairs and the College of Arts and Sciences. As SPIA has become a reality, the organizational and programmatic implications of this placement continues to dominate CJSP strategic planning.

Other strategic planning activities of the 2002-2003 year include continued efforts to implement the recommendations offered by the 2000 University Program Review Committee, the consideration and passage of new policies by the Executive Committee (changes in application/admission criteria), the development and refinement of the CJSP web site, the operation of the program’s student listserv, and the construction of two program databases. The cj student database enables the program staff to conduct more extensive assessments and analyses as well as to access information more efficiently. This database is used to track enrollment statistics as predictors for degree completion/academic performance and to measure the effectiveness of various courses, especially with regard to student performance (academic and agency) in the internship. Work continues in order to enlarge the database to include all students who have graduated from the Criminal Justice Studies Program since 1977. CJSP computers have been networked to provide retrieval access to all staff members of the program.

The establishment of scholarships expressly designated for criminal justice students (Sherry Lyons-Williams Scholarship and Kenneth M. McCarthy Scholarship) and the memorial fund for cj major William Bush necessitated the construction of donor databases that are used for both scholarship information and future solicitations. These databases will be used with our alumni records to solicit support for Criminal Justice Studies Program services and activities.

C. PUBLIC SERVICE AND OUTREACH CONTRIBUTIONS

The academic requirement of the Criminal Justice Internship is, itself, a form of public outreach. Students work primarily in state agencies, in most cases with no remuneration, in order to gain familiarity with the agency and also to complement the classroom experience. Examples of internship sites include, the UGA Legal Aid and Defender Clinic, Athens-Clarke County Police Services, Georgia Probation Offices, the Department of Juvenile Justice, and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.

The Crime Film Festival and lecture sponsored by the Criminal Justice Studies Program was open to the general UGA student population and public at large and was offered at almost no cost (small fee charged for one film only). Funds were donated from the Director’s Albert Berry Saye Chair Account as well as from the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Student Fee Allocation Committee and the School of Public and International Affairs.

Program student organization, The Criminal Justice Society, sponsored the collection and distribution of Christmas gifts for children of inmates during the Christmas holiday. This toy drive was supported by Program students, faculty and staff. In addition, the Society continued its work on a Habitat for Humanity house.

The Criminal Justice Studies Program with the Department of Political Science in the School of Public and International Affairs serves as the editorial office of Justice System Journal, a refereed publication issues by the National Center for State Courts. Professor Talarico serves as editor-in-chief and CJSP Office Manager, Dori Porter, as editorial assistant.

D. SHORT TERM GOALS FOR FY 2004

1. To implement the new admissions criteria adopted by the CJSP Executive Committee.
2. To enhance the CJSP website to include online application forms and to make the CJSP undergraduate and alumni newsletters available via the site.
3. To continue work on the CJSP Alumni database - to add all majors beginning in 1977.
4. To continue and refine major assessment.
5. To continue to refine the use of laptop computers for classroom use.
6. To increase funding for our general discretionary Foundation account.

E. ASSESSMENT

CJSP assessment outcomes are unchanged from 2002 and include:

1. general background knowledge of criminal justice administration, criminology, related law and legal processes, and the particular sectors of the criminal justice system (law enforcement, criminal courts, and corrections;
2. an ability to use various analytical tools, including the scientific method, to think critically about problems and issues in criminal justice;
3. competence in using, synthesizing, and reporting information about crime, criminal justice, and related governmental functions;
4. refinement of all communication skills so that the aforementioned skills can be effectively applied and the aforementioned knowledge effectively
shared.

Criminal Justice Studies relies on several assessment tools to gauge instructional effectiveness. These include:

1. student course performance;
2. faculty evaluation of student completion of the two major academic
requirements that constitute the program’s capstone courses;
3. student evaluation of mandatory internship;
4. agency evaluation of student intern performance and preparation;
5. exit survey of all program graduates;
6. alumni focus groups;
7. post-graduation placement.

Individual student course performance is tracked by the program’s academic advisor. As we continue to add student data, CJSP will be able to conduct more extensive assessments of course performance.
Each criminal justice student is required to complete a full semester internship. This requirement includes several, different assessment tools. UGA faculty supervising individual interns provide evaluations of the research project and analytical essays that are required of each student. The related courses (Pols/Soci 5500 and 5510) are the capstone courses in the major. Faculty evaluation of the related course work plays an important role in assessment, particularly the degree to which students have acquired the aforementioned background knowledge, analytical skills, and communication tools. Furthermore, agency supervisors provide regular evaluations of intern agency performance that help the program gauge its educational and professional effectiveness.

Each criminal justice student submits an evaluation of his/her required internship after its completion. This evaluation helps us to gauge the appropriateness of the internship placement, but more importantly the degree to which the student thought that s/he was prepared for both the academic requirements and agency responsibilities.

Criminal Justice Studies mails an exit survey to every program graduate with a letter of congratulations. This is sent within a month of graduation and has been conducted since 1996. Of the graduates surveyed after Summer and Fall terms, nine have responded. Surveys for Spring 03 graduates have been recently mailed out and we await those responses. Since the inception of the exit survey, graduate response has been respectable but insufficient for extensive data analysis. The exit surveys that have been returned, however, indicate that students are generally very satisfied with the administrative, advising, internship, and program services provided by Criminal Justice Studies. More critical comments in the past have highlighted problems with limited computer resources, particularly as they apply to classroom instruction. Student satisfaction/comment on new CJSP computer resources should be reflected in upcoming surveys. A perennial area of concern continues to be specific course availability.
Each year Criminal Justice Studies conducts an Alumni Panel where returning graduates are asked to advise current students on programs of study and career development. This program was initiated in 1995 and is held in conjunction with the University's annual homecoming activities. The 2002 Alumni Panel was well attended with more than 10 alumni present. In addition to the aforementioned interaction with current students, alumni also participate in a focus group discussion led by the program director. In past groups, alumni reinforced our emphasis on the development of analytical and communication skills, and supported student requests for computer labs in the teaching of the mandatory research methods course.

Due to time and budgetary constraints the CJ Alumni Newsletter was not published this past year. We anticipate a newsletter to be mailed and/or available online before the end of the Fall 03 term. This newsletter will contain a short placement survey. This assessment effort is designed to gauge the program's effectiveness in preparing students for careers in criminal justice.

The most obvious changes that have been made as a result of assessment evidence can be found in the ongoing refinement of the semester curriculum and major requirements, program efforts to coordinate course scheduling across several departments and recently successful efforts to secure a computer lab for the teaching of research methods. In drafting the semester curriculum Criminal Justice Studies relied on evidence from alumni focus groups and student exit surveys, among other sources. Expansion of course options in Sections II and III of the curriculum and the full semester length of the mandatory internship are examples. As departments revised and redefined courses for the semester curricula, Criminal Justice Studies took concerted efforts to see that offerings were reasonably coordinated across departments. Political Science and Sociology were especially helpful in this regard. With the establishment of the School of Public and International Affairs and CJSP’s association with it and the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, additional curricular and programmatic refinements will be ongoing.

Three recent policy changes resulting from periodic assessment include, 1) the discontinuation of the Criminal Justice Minor, 2) the addition of two courses to the Major Curriculum, and 3) the change in admission criteria. A review of the list of minor students and their major course of study revealed that a substantial portion of our limited resources was being devoted to students in fields already very closely related to criminal justice. The original intent of the minor was to permit students in more “distant” majors such as business, economics, genetics, and journalism to benefit. In contrast, those primarily taking advantage of the minor offered were those in closely related majors (sociology, political science, and psychology) where the benefit appears less substantial. The administrative costs and loss of class seats to minors, then, had become problematic and figured in the decision to discontinue the minor program.

The CJSP Executive Committee voted to include two additional courses in the major curriculum. Psyc 4240 - Psychopathology (4 credits) will be listed as an option in Section IIA (not available to those with credit for Psyc 3230 - Abnormal Psychology) and Pols 4090 (Social Justice) will be listed in Section II C. Both of these courses will provide additional alternatives for our majors as demand for classes continues to be a consideration.


A review of admission criteria revealed the need for 1) a change more in keeping with University policy and also 2) reducing the drain on limited administrative resources. Rather than have a committee continue to meet each term to determine admissions, student performance across a group of four “predictor” classes was deemed a more useful determinant for admission. The CJSP Executive Committee voted to implement this change beginning with the Fall 2003 term. We will continue to review this change in policy and its actual effect as compared with its intended impact.

F. RETENTION AND GRADUATION

Completion of the student database has enabled Criminal Justice Studies to conduct analyses of retention and graduation. The database currently contains the records of all students now enrolled in the major and those who were accepted since 1998. Since this student database includes information on date of admission and graduation, the program is able to offer a preliminary report on retention and graduation in our 2003 assessment study. (See Table 2.)

Of the 242 students who were admitted to the Criminal Justice Studies Program beginning Fall 1998 through Fall 2000, 43 changed to another major/transferred out of Criminal Justice. Of the 199 remaining students, 14 actively continue to pursue the AB degree, while 173 students have graduated with the degree. Twelve are listed as inactive. The inactive students represent approximately 6% of the 199. Of those 12, several lack only one or two courses to complete the AB degree, but for some reason have failed to do so.

In the upcoming year we plan to continue work on the database and review for factors that may impact on failure to complete one or two final classes, thereby preventing conferring of the degree. A cursory examination shows some students with a final foreign language or Independent Study that is never completed. One other consideration is the few students who fail to complete successfully, one of the two academic facets of the internship. For the most part, this is limited to the original research design and paper that are required for graduation. We will be seeking to identify those factors which may illuminate potential reasons for failure to complete the degree.

One factor that complicates the completion of these and other data analyses is the program’s limited staff. The database has been compiled by our office manager, Dori Porter, whose job description covers a wide range of tasks and obligations. The demands on Mrs. Porter combine with the fact that Criminal Justice Studies operates with no faculty lines which limits the number and frequency of statistical analyses that can be conducted.

Finally, additional support for course offerings through cooperating departments would be most helpful in easing the limitations of class space and the increasing necessity for PODs. Students continue to advise us of their frustration with inability to gain access to our major classes. This factor may impact those students who leave the Program for other majors.

G. CONCLUDING SUMMARY

Criminal Justice Studies is in sound, organizational health. Enrollments are robust, student performance is excellent, the program’s very small staff continues to provide and expand on a wide range of services for its undergraduate students, and program graduates have distinguished careers in varied criminal justice agencies at all levels of government. This is particularly noteworthy given the fact that the program operates with no faculty lines and a limited budget.

Because Criminal Justice Studies operates with such a small staff, an organizational chart is not necessary. The director of the program has a faculty appointment in one of the cooperating departments and reports directly to the deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Public and International Affairs. There is, however, regular consultation with the heads of the cooperating departments, especially political science and sociology. Other staff include an internship coordinator, an office manager, and academic advisor. Each reports to the director although the internship coordinator also teaches selected courses in sociology and in that capacity reports to the head of that department.

 

_______________________________________________

 2001-2002 ANNUAL REPORT
 CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES PROGRAM

I.  MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Faculty serve Criminal Justice Studies as administrators, members of the Executive Committee, and instructors in our interdisciplinary program.  Individual faculty accomplishments are not provided here as Criminal Justice Studies operates with no faculty lines.  Individual faculty are recruited, evaluated, and promoted within their respective departments.  Their accomplishments, then, are included in their respective departmental reports.  It is important to note,  however, that faculty associated with Criminal Justice Studies have distinguished records as scholars, teachers, and university citizens.  Included in the roster of CJSP-affiliated faculty are winners of the Josiah Meigs Awards, Sandy Beaver Professorships, Special Sandy Beaver Awards, Instructional Improvement Grants, Lilly Fellows, Senior Teaching Fellows, and other internal and external distinctions.  In the 2001-2002 academic year, for example, Stefanie Lindquist of the Political Science Department participated in the Universityís selective Lilly Program and  won one of three Russell Awards in a university-wide competition.  Also, Susette Talarico of the Political Science Department was named Albert Berry Saye Professor of American Government and Constitutional Law.

Students enrolled as majors in Criminal Justice continue to distinguish themselves in the classroom and on campus.  As detailed in Table 1, a substantial number of Criminal Justice students earned  Presidential Scholar and Dean's List distinctions during the 2001-02 academic year. The percentage of students earning Presidential Scholar/Deanís List distinctions continues to be almost one third of the total criminal justice majors enrolled in any given term.   Of the 77 students who graduated with a degree in Criminal Justice during the 2001-02 academic year approximately 25% did so with honors.  Nine students graduated with cum laude distinction, 9 with magna cum laude honors, and 1 with summa cum laude. 

Criminal Justice Studies was able to award its first scholarship in the Fall of 2001.  Michelle White was the first recipient of the Sherry Lyons-Williams Scholarship.  The scholarship was established in memory of  the first female Atlanta police officer to be killed in the line of duty and  is designated for a criminal justice major planning a career in law enforcement.  The first award was in the amount of $2000 and was made possible through a special donation to insure the scholarship could be awarded in its first year.  Recipient Michelle White, along with the Director and Internship Coordinator, participated in a ceremony at City Hall in Atlanta to award the scholarship.  To date over $42,000 has been donated to honor Ms. Lyons-Williams.

With the death of criminal justice major William Christopher Bush III, a memorial fund was set up as he had requested.  Will had asked that any funds collected be used to promote student professional development in general and, in particular, professional travel for criminal justice students.  To date over $6000 has been contributed toward our initial goal of $10,000.

As noted in last yearís report, the need for computers for criminal justice majorsí use (particularly in research methods classes) has been an urgent.  With the recent approval for funding by the Technology Task Force, Criminal Justice Studies will obtain laptops for student instructional use. Classroom use of laptops will provide the necessary computer applications and improve instruction in the required Pols/Soci 3700 (Research Methods in Criminal Justice).  These laptops will be available for Fall 2002 or Spring 2003 classes.   This is a major accomplishment for the program, as access to computers for data analysis is a critical component of our studentís education. The addition of these computers will enable criminal justice  graduates to compete and succeed in todayís electronic environment.  

During the 2001-02 academic year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its association with the national Criminal Justice Honor Society, Alpha Phi Sigma.  The UGA chapter, Upsilon Gamma Alpha, completed  its sixth full year of operation in 2001-02 and a total of 16 Criminal Justice majors were recognized at the Spring Graduation and Awards Banquet.  Members recognized achieved eligibility  through the Fall term of 2001. (See Table 2 for information on eligibility and  enrollment.)   CJSP also continued to support the undergraduate student organization, CJ Society.

In 2002, the Criminal Justice Studies Program continued the annual Graduation and Awards Banquet inaugurated in the Spring, 1997 term.  The guest speaker at this function was Ms. Terri Everett, Chief Public Defender, Houston Judicial District in Perry, Georgia.   The families of graduates and honorees were invited, various awards were presented, and the honor society induction ceremony was conducted.  Trent Shuping was recognized with the 2002 Awards for Outstanding Senior, while Sharon Nicole Hancock won the 2002 Outstanding Paper Award.  Service certificates were presented to Elinor Huff, Julie Derrick and Trent Shuping for their work with the Criminal Justice Society. Thirteen students were recognized for academic excellence (3.5 or higher overall gpa).  In addition to these exemplary student distinctions, Alison Hoeh, Philip Pilgrim and Daniel Swaja were selected for inclusion in  Whoís Who in American Colleges and Universities.  Criminal justice  major, John Stofer was recognized for his service on the Deanís Student Advisory Board.

During the past year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its broad range of program events and student services.  In addition to the  orientation  seminar for new majors, library research seminars for new majors, a guest lecture series, an annual alumni panel, workshops on career planning and graduate education, and a variety of student-faculty socials, a group of parents working in the criminal justice field were invited to speak to cj majors.  Additionally,  the program worked with the undergraduate Criminal Justice Society and helped to provide tours of criminal justice offices and institutions.  Students toured the GBI Crime Lab facility in Atlanta during the Fall 2001 term.  The Federal Law Enforcement Training Center and the Georgia State Maximum Security Correctional Facility were both toured in the Spring 2002 term. The Program also worked with the CJ Society on community service projects.  The Society sponsored a food drive in the Fall 2001 term and a work day with a local Habitat for Humanity project.  Criminal Justice Studies also published a newsletter in the Fall term, an alumni newsletter, a handbook for majors, and an internship manual.  For the fourth year, CJSP sponsored  the Federal Law Enforcement Seminar and Employment Workshop.  Funding for this was provided by the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.  Guest speakers for 2001-2002 included C. Ronald Huff, President of the American Society of Criminology; Richard  Felson of  Penn State University;  Marcus Felson of Rutgers University; Robert Friedmann, immediate past head of the Criminal Justice Department at Georgia State University; and several local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities.

As noted in previous annual reports, Criminal Justice Studies has developed a student exchange program with two universities in the United Kingdom, the University of Leicester and Lancaster University.  At the University of Leicester, this exchange program was developed with the Departments of Law and Sociology.  Three UGA students spent the Fall Semester at Leicester, while several British students from each of the universities studied at UGA for part or all of the 2001-02 academic year.

II.  STRATEGIC PLANNING

The Criminal Justice Studies Program's primary efforts in the area of strategic planning focused on the role of the program in the School of Public and International Affairs.  As of the 2001-02 academic year, Criminal Justice Studies is jointly housed in the School of Public and International Affairs and the College of Arts and Sciences.   As SPIA has become a reality,  the organizational and programmatic implications of this placement will continue to dominate CJSP strategic planning.

Other strategic planning activities of the 2001-2002 year include continued efforts to implement the recommendations offered by the 2000 University Program Review Committee, the consideration and passage of new policies by the Executive Committee (changes in hours required and semesters remaining) for application, change in summer internship to include Maymester), the development and refinement of the CJSP web site, the operation of the programís invaluable student listserv, and the construction of two program databases. A cj student database has been compiled which enables the program staff to conduct more extensive assessments and analyses as well as to access information more efficiently.  This database is used to track enrollment statistics as predictors for degree completion/academic performance and to measure the effectiveness of various courses, especially with regard to student performance (academic and agency)  in the internship. The data base will eventually be enlarged to include all students who have graduated  from the Criminal Justice Studies Program since 1977.  The program offices in Baldwin Hall have been networked to provide input and retrieval access to all staff members of the program.

One of the Executive Committeeís aforementioned policy changes requires some elaboration.  As noted previously, the Criminal Justice Executive Committee voted to include the Maymester along with the Through Summer Session for summer internships.  With this change, criminal justice students who intern in the summer will have a ten and not seven week term.  This change was implemented at the recommendation of cooperating agencies who indicated in periodic assessments that the summer term was too short.  This change in policy, then,  will enable the program to utilize the summer term more fully for the benefit of our students and will be  more equivalent to the fifteen week fall and spring term internships

The establishment of a scholarship expressly designated for a criminal justice student (Lyons-Williams Scholarship) and the memorial fund for cj major William Bush necessitated the construction of donor databases that are used for both scholarship information and future solicitations.  These databases will be used with our alumni records to solicit support for Criminal Justice Studies Program services and activities.
 

III  ASSESSMENT 

CJSP assessment outcomes are unchanged from 2001 and include:

 1. general background knowledge of criminal justice administration, criminology,   related law and legal processes, and the particular sectors of the criminaljustice system (law enforcement, criminal courts, and corrections;                                         
 2. an ability to use various analytical tools, including the scientific method, to think critically about problems and issues in criminal justice;

 3. competence in using, synthesizing, and reporting information about crime, criminal justice, and related governmental functions;

 4. refinement of all communication skills so that the aforementioned skills can be effectively applied and the aforementioned knowledge effectively
shared.

Criminal Justice Studies relies on several assessment tools to gauge instructional effectiveness.  These include:

 1. student course performance;

 2. faculty evaluation of student completion of the two major academic
     requirements that constitute the programís capstone courses;

 3. student evaluation of mandatory internship;

 4. agency evaluation of student intern performance and preparation;

 5. exit survey of all program graduates;

 6. alumni focus groups;

 7. post-graduation placement.
     
Individual student course performance is tracked by the programís academic advisor. As we continue to add student data, CJSP will be able to conduct more extensive assessments of course performance.  

Each criminal justice student is required to complete a full semester internship.  This requirement  includes several, different assessment tools.  UGA faculty supervising individual interns provide evaluations of the research project and analytical essays that are required of each student.   The related courses (Pols/Soci 5500 and 5510)  are the capstone courses in the major. Faculty evaluation of the related course work plays an important role in assessment, particularly the degree to which students have acquired the aforementioned background knowledge, analytical skills, and communication tools.    Furthermore, agency supervisors provide regular evaluations of intern agency performance that help the program gauge its educational and professional effectiveness. 

Each criminal justice student submits an evaluation of his/her required internship after its completion.  This evaluation helps us to gauge the appropriateness of the internship 
placement, but more importantly the degree to which the student thought that s/he was prepared for both the academic requirements and agency responsibilities. 

Criminal Justice Studies mails an exit survey to every program graduate with a letter of congratulations.  This is sent within a month of graduation and has been conducted since 1996.  Of the graduates surveyed since last yearís report thirteen have responded. Surveys for Spring 02 graduates have been recently mailed out and we await those responses.  Since the inception of the exit survey, graduate response has been respectable but insufficient for extensive data analysis.  The exit surveys that have been returned, however, indicate that students are generally very satisfied with the administrative, advising, internship, and program services provided by Criminal Justice Studies.  More critical comments have highlighted problems with course availability and limited computer resources, particularly as they apply to classroom instruction. The dearth of computer resources should be remedied by the upcoming acquisition of laptops for classroom use by criminal justice majors.

Each year Criminal Justice Studies conducts an Alumni Panel where returning graduates are asked to advise current students on  programs of study and career development.  This program was initiated in 1995 and is held in conjunction with the University's annual homecoming activities.  The 2001 Alumni Panel was well attended with more than 12 alumni present.  In addition to the aforementioned interaction with current students, alumni also participate in a focus group discussion led by the program director.  In past groups, alumni reinforced our emphasis on the development of analytical and communication skills, and supported student requests for computer labs in the teaching of the mandatory research methods course. 

Each year Criminal Justice Studies issues an Alumni Newsletter which also contains a short placement survey.  This assessment effort is designed to gauge the program's effectiveness in preparing students for careers in criminal justice.   Related information was included in the self-study report that Criminal Justice Studies prepared for the 99-00 program review committee.   This record is regularly updated and available on request.

The most obvious changes  that have been made as a result of assessment evidence can be found in the ongoing refinement of the semester curriculum and major requirements, program efforts to coordinate course scheduling across several departments and recently successful efforts to secure a computer lab for the teaching of research methods.  In drafting the semester curriculum Criminal Justice Studies relied on evidence from alumni focus groups and student exit surveys, among other sources.  Expansion of course options in Sections II and III of the curriculum and the full semester length of the mandatory internship are examples.  As departments revised and redefined courses for the semester curricula, Criminal Justice Studies took concerted efforts to see that offerings were reasonably coordinated across departments.  Political Science and Sociology were especially helpful in this regard.   As the aforementioned School of Public and International Affairs is established and CJSP situated in that and the College of Arts and Sciences, additional curricular and programmatic refinements can be expected.

IV.  RETENTION AND GRADUATION

With the partial completion of a student database, Criminal Justice Studies will be able to conduct refined analyses of retention and graduation.   The database currently contains the records of all students now enrolled in the major and those who were accepted since 1996.  Since this student database includes information on date of admission and graduation, the program will be able to offer an initial report on retention and graduation in our 2002 assessment study.  One factor that complicates the completion of these and other data analyses is the programís limited staff.  The database has been compiled by our office manager, Dori  Porter, whose job description covers a wide range of tasks and obligations.  The demands on Mrs. Porter combine with the fact that Criminal Justice Studies operates with no faculty lines to limit the number and frequency of statistical analyses that can be conducted.

V.  OVERALL HEALTH OF UNIT

Criminal Justice Studies is in sound, organizational health.  Enrollments are robust, student performance is excellent, the programís very small staff continues to provide and expand on a wide range of services for its undergraduate students, and program graduates have distinguished careers in varied criminal justice agencies at all levels of government.    This is particularly noteworthy given the fact that the program operates with no faculty lines and a limited budget.

Because Criminal Justice Studies operates with such a small staff, an organizational chart is not necessary.  The director of the program has a faculty appointment in one of the cooperating departments and reports directly to the deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and the School of Public and International Affairs.   There is, however, regular consultation with the heads of the cooperating departments, especially political science and sociology.  Other staff include an internship coordinator, an office manager, and academic advisor.  Each reports to the director although the internship coordinator also teaches selected courses in sociology  and in that capacity reports to the head of that department. 

2000-2001 ANNUAL REPORT

CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES PROGRAM



I. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS
 

Faculty serve Criminal Justice Studies as administrators, members of the Executive Committee, and instructors in our interdisciplinary program. Individual faculty accomplishments are not provided here as Criminal Justice Studies operates with no faculty lines. Individual faculty are recruited, evaluated, and promoted within their respective departments. Their accomplishments, then, are included in their respective departmental reports. It is important to note, however, that faculty associated with Criminal Justice Studies have distinguished records as scholars, teachers, and university citizens. Included in the roster of CJSP-affiliated faculty are winners of the Josiah Meigs Awards, Sandy Beaver Professorships, Special Sandy Beaver Awards, Instructional Improvement Grants, Lilly Fellows, Senior Teaching Fellows, and other internal and external distinctions. In the 2000-2001 academic year, for example, Stefanie Lindquist of the Political Science Department participated in the University's selective Lilly Program and Reuben May of the Sociology Department won one of two Russell Awards. These faculty teach courses in Section II of the CJSP curriculum.
 

Students enrolled as majors in Criminal Justice continue to distinguish themselves in the classroom and on campus. As detailed in Table 1, a substantial number of Criminal Justice students earned Presidential Scholar and Dean's List distinctions during the 2000-01 academic year. From Summer, 2000 through Spring, 2001, 51 Criminal Justice majors were named Presidential Scholars while 76 were named to the Dean's List. Of the 68 students who graduated with a degree in Criminal Justice during the 2000-01 academic year, 3 did so with summa cum laude distinction, 9 with magna cum laude honors, and 6 with cum laude
 

During the 2000-01 academic year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its association with the national Criminal Justice Honor Society, Alpha Phi Sigma. The UGA chapter, Upsilon Gamma Alpha, completed its fifth full year of operation in 2000-01 and inducted a total of 15 Criminal Justice majors through Fall 2000. (See Table 2 for information on eligibility and enrollment.) CJSP also continued to support the undergraduate student organization, CJ Society, and to help establish a UGA chapter of the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice. 
 

In 2001, the Criminal Justice Studies Program continued the annual Graduation and Awards Banquet inaugurated in the Spring, 1997 term. Guest speaker at this function was John Andrejko, Special Agent in Charge, Drug Enforcement Administration, Atlanta Office. The families of graduates and honorees were invited, various awards were presented, and the honor society induction ceremony was conducted. Kelly Fitzgerald and Nicole Andrejko were recognized with 2001 Awards for Outstanding Senior, while Jennifer McMahon won the 2001 Outstanding Paper Award. Service certificates were presented to Natalie Block, Lindsay Fox, Heather Borst, Nicole Andrejko, and Kelly Fitzgerald for their work with the Criminal Justice Society. Twelve students received academic achievement certificates for grade point averages of 3.5 or higher. One of these students, Jason Rozier, was also recognized as the fifth First Honor Graduate in the program's history. In addition to these exemplary student distinctions, Nicole Andrejko, Nicole Hancock, Alison Hoeh, Stephen Kepper, and Natasha Morgan were included in Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities, Kwadwo Agyei-Aye was selected for Leadership UGA, and Jessica Kingsley was elected to the Blue Key National Honor Society. Furthermore, Stacey Greene was recognized by the National Association of Blacks in Criminal Justice at their national meeting in Atlanta. Finally, Nicole Andrejko served on the Dean's Student Advisory Board and Jennifer McMahon won the Patterson Scholarship. McMahon's distinction represents the second year in a row that a criminal justice major has won one of the two major Arts and Sciences scholarships. 
 

During the past year, Criminal Justice Studies continued its broad range of program events and student services. These include the orientation seminar for new majors, library research seminars for new majors, a guest lecture series, an annual alumni panel, workshops on career planning and graduate education, and a variety of student-faculty socials. Additionally, the program worked with the undergraduate Criminal Justice Society and helped to provide tours of criminal justice offices and institutions. Criminal Justice Studies also published a newsletter in the Fall and Spring terms, an alumni newsletter, a handbook for majors, and an internship manual. For the fourth year, CJSP sponsored the Federal Law Enforcement Seminar and Employment Workshop. Funding for this was provided by the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences. Guest speakers for 2000-2001 included James Fyfe, professor of criminal justice at Temple University and an internationally recognized expert on police use of force; George F. Cole, emeritus professor of political science at the University of Connecticut and author of The American System of Criminal Justice, a text often used in Pols 3600, a central course in the CJSP curriculum; and several local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities. 
 

As noted in previous annual reports, Criminal Justice Studies has developed a student exchange program with two universities in the United Kingdom, the University of Leicester and Lancaster University. At the University of Leicester, this exchange program was developed with the Departments of Law and Sociology. CJ and Sociology major, Ramsey Knowles, spent the Fall Semester at Leicester. At Lancaster, the exchange program extends to Law, Applied Social Science, and other disciplines. During the 2000-01 academic year, Criminal Justice major, Diedre Hampton, studied at Lancaster University for the entire 2000-2001 academic year. 
 

II. STRATEGIC PLANNING
 

The Criminal Justice Studies Program's primary efforts in the area of strategic planning focused on the possible role of the program in the School of Public and International Affairs. In the 2000-2001 academic year, a proposal to change the Department of Political Science into a School of Public and International Affairs was approved by the Arts and Sciences Senate, the University Council, and the Board of Regents. In this proposal, Criminal Justice Studies was identified as jointly housed in the School of Public and International Affairs and the College of Arts and Sciences. As this proposal is implemented in 2001-2002 and subsequent academic years, the organizational and programmatic implications of this placement will dominate CJSP strategic planning. 
 

Other strategic planning activities of the 2000-2001 year include continued efforts to implement the recommendations offered by the 2000 University Program Review Committee, the consideration and passage of new policies for double majors, the development and refinement of the CJSP web site, the operation of the program's invaluable student listserv, and the construction of two program databases. With the technical expertise of CJSP Office Manager, Dori Porter, a student database is being compiled that will enable the program staff to conduct more extensive assessments and analyses. This database will be used to track enrollment statistics as predictors for degree completion/academic performance and to measure the effectiveness of various courses, especially with regard to student performance (academic and agency) in the internship. The data base will eventually be enlarged to include all students who have graduated from the Criminal Justice Studies Program. The program offices in Baldwin Hall are in the process of being networked to provide input and retrieval access to all staff members of the program. 
 

Finally, the establishment of a scholarship expressly designated for a criminal justice student (Lyons-Williams Scholarship) necessitated the construction of a donor database that could be used for both scholarship information and future solicitations. 
 

III ASSESSMENT
 

CJSP assessment outcomes are unchanged from 2000 and include: 
 

1. general background knowledge of criminal justice administration, criminology, related law and legal processes, and the particular sectors of the criminal justice system (law enforcement, criminal courts, and corrections; 

2. an ability to use various analytical tools, including the scientific method, to think critically about problems and issues in criminal justice; 
 

3. competence in using, synthesizing, and reporting information about crime, criminal justice, and related governmental functions; 
 

4. refinement of all communication skills so that the aforementioned skills can be effectively applied and the aforementioned knowledge effectively 

shared. 
 

Criminal Justice Studies relies on several assessment tools to gauge instructional effectiveness. These include: 
 

  1. student course performance;
     
  2. faculty evaluation of student completion of the two major academic
requirements that constitute the program's capstone courses; 
 
  1. student evaluation of mandatory internship;
  2. agency evaluation of student intern performance and preparation;
     
  3. exit survey of all program graduates;
     
  4. alumni focus groups;
     
  5. post-graduation placement.
     
Individual student course performance is tracked by the program's academic advisor. Once the student database is completed, CJSP will be able to conduct more extensive assessments of course performance. 
 

Each criminal justice student is required to complete a full semester internship. This requirement includes several, different assessment tools. UGA faculty supervising individual interns provide evaluations of the research project and analytical essays that are required of each student. The related courses (Pols/Soci 5500 and 5510) are the capstone courses in the major. Faculty evaluation of the related coursework plays an important role in assessment, particularly the degree to which students have acquired the aforementioned background knowledge, analytical skills, and communication tools. Furthermore, agency supervisors provide regular evaluations of intern agency performance that help the program gauge its educational and professional effectiveness. 
 

Each criminal justice student submits an evaluation of his/her required internship after its completion. This evaluation helps us to gauge the appropriateness of the internship 

placement, but more importantly the degree to which the student thought that s/he was prepared for both the academic requirements and agency responsibilities. 
 

Criminal Justice Studies mails an exit survey to every program graduate with a letter of congratulations. This is sent within a month of graduation and has been conducted since 1996. Of the 38 graduates surveyed in Summer and Fall 2000, 19 have responded. Spring 01 surveys are only beginning to come in. Since the inception of the exit survey, graduate response has been respectable but insufficient for extensive data analysis. The exit surveys that have been returned, however, indicate that students are generally very satisfied with the administrative, advising, internship, and program services provided by Criminal Justice Studies. More critical comments have highlighted problems with course availability and limited computer resources, particularly as they apply to classroom instruction. 
 

Each year Criminal Justice Studies conducts an Alumni Panel where returning graduates are asked to advise current students on programs of study and career development. This program was initiated in 1995 and is held in conjunction with the University's annual homecoming activities. The 2000 Alumni Panel was well attended with more than fifteen alumni and over fifty students present. In addition to the aforementioned interaction with current students, alumni also participate in a focus group discussion led by the program director. In past groups, alumni reinforced our emphasis on the development of analytical and communication skills, and supported student requests for computer labs in the teaching of the mandatory research methods course. 
 

Each year Criminal Justice Studies issues an Alumni Newsletter which also contains a short placement survey. This assessment effort is designed to gauge the program's effectiveness in preparing students for careers in criminal justice. Related information was included in the self-study report that Criminal Justice Studies prepared for the 99-00 program review committee. This record is regularly updated and available on request. 
 

The most obvious changes that have been made as a result of assessment evidence can be found in the ongoing refinement of the semester curriculum and major requirements, program efforts to coordinate course scheduling across several departments, and continuing (but as yet unsuccessful) efforts to secure a computer lab for the teaching of research methods. In drafting the semester curriculum Criminal Justice Studies relied on evidence from alumni focus groups and student exit surveys, among other sources. Expansion of course options in Sections II and III of the curriculum and the full semester length of the mandatory internship are examples. As departments revised and redefined courses for the semester curricula, Criminal Justice Studies took concerted efforts to see that offerings were reasonably coordinated across departments. Political Science and Sociology were especially helpful in this regard. As the aforementioned School of Public and International Affairs is established and CJSP situated in that and the College of Arts and Sciences, additional curricular and programmatic refinements can be expected. 
 

IV. OVERALL HEALTH OF UNIT
 

Criminal Justice Studies is in sound, organizational health. Enrollments are robust, student performance is excellent, the staff continues to provide and expand on a wide range of services for its undergraduate students, and program graduates have distinguished careers in varied criminal justice agencies at all levels of government. This is particularly noteworthy given the fact that the program operates with no faculty lines and a limited budget. 
 

Because Criminal Justice Studies operates with such a small staff, an organizational chart is not necessary. The director of the program has a faculty appointment in one of the cooperating departments and reports directly to the dean of Arts and Sciences. There is, however, regular consultation with the heads of the cooperating departments, especially political science and sociology. Other staff include an internship coordinator, an office manager, and academic advisor. Each reports to the director although the internship coordinator also teaches selected courses in sociology and in that capacity reports to the head of that department. 
 
 

Table 1 
 

2000-2001 Statistics for Criminal Justice Studies
Admissions Overall GPA for All Enrolled Majors Enrollment Graduates
Summer 2000
19
3.09
91
16
Fall 2000
33
3.27
129
22
Spring 2001
37
3.13
145
30

 
Presidential Scholar/Dean's List
Presidential Scholar
Dean's List
Summer 2000
13
12
Fall 2000
16
30
Spring 2001
22
34

 
 
 
Graduates
Graduates
Graduation with Honors
Summer 2000
16
1 cum laude

3 magna cum laude

1 summa cum laude

1 with honors

Fall 2000
22
1 cum laude

3 magna cum laude

1 summa cum laude

1 with honors

Spring 2001
30
4 cum laude

3 magna cum laude

1 summa cum laude


 
 
Alpha Phi Sigma National Honor Society 

Upsilon Gamma Alpha Chapter - UGA

Students Eligible
Students Inducted
Summer 2000
n/a*
n/a*
Fall 2000
22
15
Spring 2001
28
not yet determined
Totals
50
 

Eligibility is set by the national society and consists of the following requirements: (1) completion of at least one-third of all college level work; (2) a 3.0 or higher GPA for all college level work; (3) a 3.2 or higher for the major GPA; and (4) the completion of at least twenty hours in the major. Since the establishment of the local chapter, out of all those meeting the criteria, approximately 155 Criminal Justice majors have elected to join and been inducted. 
 

*eligibility now determined each Fall and Spring only 

Appendices 

Criminal Justice Studies Banquet Program, April 6, 2001 
 

Criminal Justice Alumni Newsletter, Summer 2000 
 

Criminal Justice Studies Newsletter, Fall 2000 
 

Criminal Justice Studies Newsletter, Spring 2001